Cinnamon’s beneficial effects on the body

Cinammon balances blood sugar and lowers cholesterol?

That lovely fragrance of cinnamon comes from the bark of the cinnamon tree, a moderately large evergreen that is native to Sri Lanka. It has been around for at least 2000 years. According to the Bible, Moses used cinnamon to make holy oil (Exodus 20:33). Legend has it that the emperor, Nero, burned a year’s supply of cinnamon at his wife’s funeral. Cinnamon, known botanically as Cinnamomum zeylanicum, has the ability to have a positive effect on blood sugar and cholesterol.

Aside from adding spice and being inexpensive and easy to obtain, cinnamon’s glory may lie in its ability to regulate blood sugar. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has published several cinnamon studies on human beings. Findings report that about one half teaspoon a day results in an impressive improvement in blood sugar. Cinnamon works by enhancing the body’s ability to use the insulin it already produces, especially in muscle tissue.

Cinnamon has also demonstrated a highly beneficial impact on cholesterol. Specifically, it lowers the LDL, more commonly known as the “bad cholesterol.”

Across the board, cinnamon is known to ease intestinal cramps, relieve gas, promote movement of food through the digestive system and act as a muscle relaxant. It has obtained some popularity as a method to relieve both menstrual and night time leg cramps as well.

Another helpful property of cinnamon is its antibacterial effect. It is especially useful for fighting intestinal germs. Some people claim it can ward off mild food poisoning.

The only form of cinnamon that is truly useful for humans is powdered bark, in capsule form. The oil contains compounds that can be harmful. Doses of 1000mg daily have been shown to make a difference in both blood sugar and LDL. 

Consumers need to know that the powdered cinnamon found in supermarkets is far too old to have any healing benefit. The most efficacious method for cinnamon intake is a commercial preparation designed for that purpose.

Although the oil can be harmful to humans if ingested regularly, it is useful in other ways. Just as cinnamon fights intestinal “bugs”, it also fights the real thing. A few drops of cinnamon oil on strips of white cotton ribbon, white cotton bias tape or plain paper towels hung in windows can be an effective insect repellent.

Cinnamon should be part of a daily eating plan, suggests A. Kahn, M.D., a diabetes researcher who has studied the effects of cinnamon on blood sugar. For the best effects, however, it takes more than a sprinkle on your morning oatmeal.

Kahn, A.Diabetes Care. December 2003; vol 26 (12): pp 3215-3218.
Qin, B., et al. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. July 2003

Learn more at http://www.naturalnews.com/025590_cinnamon_blood_sugar.html#ixzz1UlWnQZeQ

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5 Tips to cool your hot laptop

1. Adjust your power settings from “high performance” to a more “balanced” or “power saver” plan. 

This will tell the system to only use the power required to run your applications, rather than always using the maximum processor speed; if you need to play games or other intensive work, you can switch back to the high performance plan as necessary.

2. Use dust remover spray to clean out of the laptop’s vents.

Dust can accumulate in and block the laptop’s fan vents — a problem easily solved with a can of compressed gas (~$10). Turn off your laptop and spray the vent to remove the dust.

3. Use a laptop cooling pad that has a fan or two.

Laptop pads that have vents but no fans can also increase the air flow around your laptop and they’re very portable, but for stronger cooling needs, a fan is the best way to go. For this test, I used a Belkin F5L055, but there are also several others selected by this site’s previous guide that you can explore or you could even custom build a laptop cooling system if you’re so inclined.

4. Keep your working environment or computer room as comfortably cool as possible.

Computers, like most people, work much better in air conditioned environments. Most server rooms or data centers operate at 70 degrees or below, according to Server Fault, and that seems like an ideal temperature recommendation for home offices as well.

5. Shut down your computer when not in use, and especially when you are not at home.

The last thing you need when you get home is to find out your laptop was a fire hazard (one of the dangers of overheating laptops).

A healthy computer makes a happy user.Taking the steps above brought down the internal temperature of an old and dangerously hot laptop from 181° Fahrenheit (83° Celsius) to 106° F (41° C) — a difference of 41% after one hour of using the active laptop cooling pad and bringing the room temperature down to 68 degrees.

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